Thanksgiving Foods Dogs and Cats Can Eat

thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the biggest meal of the year for many people. The holiday not only fills up your family and loved ones, but also your pets that scavenge the area around the feast for crumbs and sympathetic under-the-table feeders. As a pet owner, it is important to know what your pet can and cannot consume. So we are here to help! Many of the healthy foods you eat on Thanksgiving are the same ingredients we use in our formulas!

  • Turkey: Turkey is the main event of the meal on Thanksgiving. Opinions differ on whether raw or cooked meat is better for pets, so consult your veterinarian if you don’t feel sure. Either way, feed your pet lean, white meat instead of the fattier dark meat, and try not to go overboard.
  • Cranberries: Cranberries are great for both cats and dogs. Not only are they full of vitamins A, B1, B2 and C, but they’re well-known for helping maintain healthy urinary tracts. On Thanksgiving, if you’re making cranberry sauce from scratch with fresh fruit, feel free to share. Canned cranberry sauce and jellied cranberry sauce, on the other hand, are full of sugar and should not be given to pets.
  • Carrots: Full of vitamins, fiber and potassium, fresh, raw carrots a great sweet treat for dogs. Drop a few carrots your dog’s way before you cook them or add a bunch of salt and fat. Cats can also enjoy the benefits of carrots, but cook them first for your feline. Raw carrots may be hard for some cats to digest.
  • Green beans: The perfect anytime snack for dogs! These nutritional powerhouses are packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber, and they’re also low in calories, so even if your dog is on a diet, you won’t have to feel guilty about slipping him some string beans on Thanksgiving. But we are talking fresh green beans, not green bean casserole!
  • Sweet Potato: Full of fiber, vitamins, carotenoids, sweet potatoes rank low on the glycemic index which means they won’t spike your dog’s blood sugar. If you want to share sweet potatoes with your dog, set some aside without any salt or butter on it.
  • Pumpkin: What’s Thanksgiving without a little pumpkin! Pumpkin is good for dogs to eat not only because it’s low in calories and bursting with vitamins, beta carotene and fiber, but also because it helps with a dog’s digestion. However, leave the canned pumpkin for the humans. The processed stuff isn’t good for your pets!

Remember, it’s okay to give your pet safe table food every now and then, but always remember moderation is key. And if you are unsure of what is a safe food for your pet, be sure to consult your veterinarian.

Happy Thanksgiving to you and your pet from Precise!

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How to Make a DIY Dog First-Aid Kit

dog travel

With the holiday season upon us, families take to the road and travel to see friends and family for the holiday often carrying their dog in tow. To make sure your pooch is safe while traveling, it’s important that every pet owner have a pet First-Aid Kit for the road. Here’s what to include in your easy do-it-yourself doggy first-aid kit:

First and foremost, it is important to learn how to securely restrain your dog in a vehicle. You make sure your kids are buckled before driving away, so why not you’re your pet. There are a wide number of pet car-restraint products on the market and it’s important to invest in one so to protect your pet incase of an unforeseen accident.

Next, you will need to purchase a first aid manual for pets. There are some great guides out there including one put out by the American Red Cross (they even have an app now!). In addition you should write down the name and locations of nearby veterinary hospitals, while also having the phone number for the pet poison control hotline. The ASPCA operates a 24-hour Animal Poison Control Center helpline at (888) 426-4435.

Now onto the supplies. Your doggie first aid kit should include, but isn’t limited to:

  • Bandages
  • small scissors
  • hydrogen peroxide for accidental poisoning (check with poison control hotline before administering)
  • styptic swabs (to stop any bleeding)
  • tape or stretchy wrap
  • ear thermometer
  • wash cloths and mild liquid soap
  • water and clean bowls

 

Now that your first aid kit is together, it’s time to hit the road! Safe Travels!

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What’s In A Tail Wag?

Most people believe that the wagging tail of a dog expresses excitement. In truth, the direction and manner in which dogs wave their tail can convey a variety of attitudes according to researchers. Check out this info graphic from PETA that breaks down the meanings of some of the most common pet behaviors.

pet tail wags

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November is Adopt a Senior Pet Month

senior dog

After celebrating ‘Adopt a shelter dog’ month in October, November gives us another reason to celebrate our furry friends with ‘Adopt a senior pet month’. ‘Adopt a senior pet month’ strives to spread awareness of the fact that many senior pets fill rescues and shelters but the majority goes un-adopted. Most often, older animals are left behind in shelters, as individuals and families want an animal that they can raise and have for a long time. Any dog seven years or older is considered a “senior”, and though they do not get adopted as much as their puppy or kitten counterparts, older pets often adapt very easily to new surroundings, are generally calmer than the younger pets, and are often already housebroken. You should use this month to spread the word on why it’s awesome to have an older pet!

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