Three Tips on Finding a Pet Sitter

Happy Professional Pet Sitters Week! We want to celebrate all of the wonderful caretakers in our fur babies’ lives and help our friends who don’t have a pet sitter to find the right fit for their family!

Unfortunately, we can’t always take our four-legged friends on the road with us, so it’s up to you to decide who to call to watch your fur baby while you’re away. If a family member or friend is not available, and a kennel is out of the question, you’re going to have to enlist a pet sitter you may have never met before. Not to worry, this intimidating process becomes easier with these three tips to help you find the very best temporary caretaker for your pet:

#1. Interview potential candidates

It is important to trust the person you are planning to let in your home to spend one-on-one time with your pet. Ask friends and family if they know of any trustworthy candidates to start your search. If the list comes up short, check out reliable websites like Care.com which features profiles of caretakers, highlighting the pet sitter’s experience, location, age, hourly rate, and service ratings. Once you gather all the information that you need about these contenders, pick a top three to interview either by phone or in person. When you meet, ask them about their experience with animals, and highlight your pet’s unique needs and habits that the caretaker will need to know. If you feel the need, be sure to ask for references from the sitter so you can learn more about their reputation as a caretaker.

#2. Make sure they are reliable 

We want our caretakers to be trustworthy, but also to be someone we can rely on to show up and love on our pets while we are away. Let’s be honest, our fur babies rule the roost of our households, but they still need to know what they can and cannot get away with. Make sure the new sitter knows your house rules and routines so they can maintain the same schedule for your pet.

#3. Introduce your pet

The most important factor we don’t have any say in is your pet’s opinion! Introduce your pet to the caretaker, and to see how your pet interacts with them. Their first meeting should not be when you plan to leave the caretaker with your pet, as your pet may not be comfortable around this sitter. At the end of the day, your pet is going to be spending time with this person and if they don’t respond well, it may not work. Allow some time for your pet to warm up to their new friend. Be sure to let them play and see if your pet approves of your choice.

In celebration of Professional Pet Sitters Week, let’s take some time to show our fur babies’ caretakers some love (don’t worry, your pet is still your number one fan). Have you recently conquered the hunt for the perfect pet sitter? Share your tips for finding a reliable caretaker below.

Tags: , , , , Comments: 0

Five Household Dangers That Could Turn Your Fur-ever Friends into ‘Sick Puppies’

One of the greatest joys of having a pet is the unconditional, non-stop love and affection that they give. For most of us, we consider our pets to be like our children — and, just like children, they require a lot of TLC to keep them safe from harmful dangers that lie around the house.

9.09

Here are a few potential household items that you should keep an eye out for while your furry friends are around, in order to avoid the “uh-oh’s” and “oh-no’s” that accompany being a pet parent:

1. Human medications

While this may seem like a no-brainer, if cats and dogs are able to reach your prescriptions, most of the time they will do whatever it takes to get their paws into trouble, which could cause serious life-threatening harm. Be aware of the placement of any type of medication as these are toxic and could harm your animals — ie. NSAID’s, birth control, sleep aids, acetaminophen, and more. To avoid the risk of consumption, place medicine into cabinets where animals are unable to access; make sure that medicines are not left on the counter and are always closed properly.

2. String, yarn, rubber bands

Although cat’s love playing with strings and other types of bands, be sure that you remove these items from their reach when you are done using them. An unattended pet with these small items could result in a choking hazard. Place these items in containers and drawers that are impossible for your pet to open while they are unsupervised.

3. Plants

Your guests aren’t the only ones who admire your indoor and outdoor plants—pets seem to enjoy them as well; whether that be for entertainment, or as a post-dinner chew toy. However, some plants are known to be be toxic — ie. oleander, hyacinth bulbs. To avoid the possibility of ingestion, try hanging plants where your pets cannot reach, place fences around outdoor gardens, or simply avoid purchasing these items.

4. Cleaning Products

Be aware of where you store cleaning products and if they are easily accessible to your pets. Keeping toilet bowl cleaner on the bathroom floor, for example, could seem like a curious chew toy for some pets, when in reality, it contains harmful toxins that could result in serious injuries for your animal. Try storing your household cleaning items on a shelf in your laundry room, or underneath the kitchen sink (if the cabinets are secure).

5. Leftovers 

Most of the time, it’s hard to resist the tableside begging for your leftover dinner scraps. Though it takes a lot of willpower, be aware that there are many ‘people foods’ that are harmful for animals to ingest. Some of these include: chocolate, onions, garlic, grapes, and even bones. To keep your canine safe, try to resist those big eyes and stick to their kibble, or dry food diet. We strongly advise against feeding your animal from the table, but if you just can’t resist, keep some Healthy Habits® treats around to pacify your playful pet while you attempt to eat in peace.

In the case that your pet happens to ingest any of the items above, be sure to call poison control for precautionary steps to ensure your pet’s safety.

General rule of thumb: if it’s hazardous for you to consume, it’s more than likely harmful for your pet to consume. Do you have any of these items at-bay for your pets’ curiosity to take over? Try keeping these tips in mind in order to keep your little (or big!) fur balls happy and healthy.

Tags: , , , , Comments: 0

6 Tips to Keep Your Pet Cool During the Dog Days of Summer

It’s hot out there. As the temperature rises, so does the amount of potential dangers for our pets — sunburn, dehydration, and heatstroke, yikes! So the Precise team has compiled six tips for keeping it cool in the summer heat and humidity. Let’s get the sprinklers going:

Picture1

Add some ice, ice, baby

In addition to always making sure your pet is staying hydrated, add in a few ice cubes to their water bowl to help cool them down. Another option is to make your pet a yummy iced popsicle to treat and cool them. Might we recommend making catsicles out of your Precise Naturals canned food?

Hang inside between 10 and 2

The midday sun shines the brightest and burns the hottest. To prevent dehydration and possible heatstroke, keep your pet out of the sun during this hottest time of the day. Bring your pet indoors between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Play with your kitten or walk your puppy in the morning or evening in order to keep their core temperatures down while exuding strenuous activity.

Walk on grass, not asphalt

A dog’s paw pads are both adorable and sensitive. When the temperature is high, the hot asphalt can quickly become too hot and burn your pup’s paws. Have your dog walk on the grass and not the cement to prevent any damage.

Keep it breezy in the shade

If your pet has to be in the sun and hot weather, provide lots of shade for them to relax in. Trees and tarps are the best providers of shade because they allow for a breeze to blow through. Doghouses are actually not good options for pets to escape the sun because they don’t allow wind circulation to filter through, retaining the warmth.

Prevent your pet from feelin’ the burn

Dogs and cats can get sunburned too. However, human sunscreens that contain zinc oxide, like the white lotion lifeguards slather on themselves, are toxic to dogs.  Sunscreens with salicylates are also dangerous for cats. Instead of sunscreen, put your pet in a hat or rash guard with UPF protection built in.

Never leave your pet in the locked car

This is one of the biggest precautions to take in order to prevent your pet from overheating this summer. When it is 80 degrees outside, it can reach 99 degrees in a locked car within 10 minutes. Leaving a pet in a car in the heat can cause heat stroke, irreparable organ damage, and even death. In some states, it is actually illegal.

The dog days of summer are upon us. If you follow the advice of these six tips, you and your furry friend can have fun and stay safe in the summer heat!

Tags: , , , Comments: 0

3 Tips to Prevent the Possibility of Lyme Disease in Dogs

April showers bring May flowers, and lots of time outside for you and your pet. Spring has sprung, and the warm weather has us all itching to get out and seek adventure on a hike in the woods, in a pasture, or at the park.

Lyme Disease - Outside

For these reasons, April has been deemed National Prevention of Lyme Disease Awareness month, as ticks are prevalent in these outdoor areas, and are ready “suck” the fun out of outdoor playtime.

What’s lyme disease exactly? Well, it’s a tick-borne illness, caused by the transmission of infected bacteria, commonly from a “deer tick,” also known as the black-legged tick; we have 3 tips from our global veterinarian, Dr. Stephan Leoni, on how to help stop these biters in their tracks.

Grab a Good Repulsive Spray, or Drop-On

These two preventative methods are recommended for pets because of their ability to repel ticks, fleas, and mosquitos alike, while also remaining water and sweat proof. This composition can be placed between your pet’s shoulder blades, or all along their body, depositing into sweat glands where the active ingredients will be released over several weeks’ time.

Search, search, search

Ticks hide out in warm places: in-between your pet’s toes, under their armpits, behind their ears, and around their tail and head. If you feel a bump, separate the fur surrounding the tick and grab some tweezers. Proceed to pull the ticks body away from the skin, being cautious not to crush the tick, or leave any limbs of the insect behind. After removal, clean your pet’s skin with soap and water, and flush the tick down the toilet. The longer the tick is attached to your pet’s skin, the greater the risk becomes of being infected (more than 48 hours).

Get Some Immune Support

Incorporating a diet packed with vitamin E and C along with carotenoids and flavonoids will help boost your pet’s immune system, in case of infection. This will allow your pet to help fight the bacteria until they are able to receive medical attention, and will also serve as a great source of nutrients if your pet is recovering from the disease. Might we recommend our Precise Holistic Complete line of dry dog food formulas?

Though the risk of becoming infected is minor, nothing can rule out Lyme Disease indefinitely. If you notice the following symptoms from your pet after playing outdoors, please contact your veterinarian immediately.

Tags: , , , , Comments: 0

4 Reasons to Pick Up the “Number Two”

We really weren’t kidding, it is National Pooper Scooper week—and yes, we’ve written a blog post about it. Whether you’re at the beach, the park, even sitting in the comfort of your home, there is no escaping nature’s call. Litterboxes ease your worry for indoor cats, outdoor felines are known to burry their “number two;” and dogs, well, they’ll go just about anywhere. It’s easy to feel a bit lazy, and confident that your pet will take care of their business with no help from you, but until the day pets stand upright and utilize the toilet, that’s not reality. Here are 4 reasons why it’s time to stop being lazy, and pick up your pet’s business.

Screen Shot 2016-03-29 at 2.59.14 PM

1. Storm Water carries it all around town

And directly into our waterways; this means that nitrogen from the waste is added to the water, depleting the oxygen that keeps underwater wildlife alive. This process may also transmit diseases such as E. Coli and Salmonella to humans who unknowingly drink the contaminated water.

2. You don’t want your guests thinking “what’s that smell?”

If your pet does their duty in a litter box, it’s your job to grab the scooper. Lucky for you, many pet litters will deodorize the smell somewhat, but not all. Cats can be quite peculiar about their bathroom habits, and if they aren’t met, they will find an area that is. They like a clean area with a neutral smell, and may prefer a certain litter over others. It is recommended to scoop out your pet’s litter box daily while replacing the litter twice a week.

3. It’s common courtesy

And your responsibility as a pet owner, especially when your pup decides to venture off through the neighborhood and mark its territory on other lawns. Help end the worry of pet landmines for beach goers, other pet owners by the park, city explorers, and yourself by scooping!   

4. And it’s the law

The reasons above should be a clear indication as to why…

Now that’s what we like to call the ugly truth; we know, we wish it wasn’t so too. Happy scooping!

Image Credit

Tags: , Comments: 0